Charging EB70 via AC200P, interesting

Decided to top off new EB70S by using AC200P AC. Curiously the EB70S adapter says 200W but AC200P is showing 240W draw. Anyone have an idea why the AC200P would show 40 more watts than the EB70S adapter is rated at? The EB70S shows 191W input which is what I see when plugged into wall outlet.

The AC200P DC side is off and nothing else is plugged in. That to me is a lot of loss. Any ideas? @BLUETTI

Might be wrong. The EB70S adapter says input 2.5A, I need to do the math. For some reason (probably cause it’s a T200 model) I thought input & output would be 200watts max.

Came up with 300w input, is my math right (2.5A, 120V). Would the adapter draw more watts than it can output (200max)? When does that make sense? I feel a learning session about to begin.

My AC200P’s AC output screen is never correct, it will show 100-200 watts higher than a watt meter connected to it. Same with most of the other info displayed so I tend to ignore it and rely on my watt meters. Most of my other Bluetti’s are fairly accurate.

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It will always take more than 100 watts to produce 100 watts from and regulated DC power source. Converting and regulating the voltage consumes power in addition to the power being received. The displayed wattages are also approximations only and are not “meter” accurate.

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It is likely due to inefficiencies. I believe the EB70(S) input shows power added to the battery, which is why a 192W (24V 8A) adapter only shows 155W even when there is actually 24v 8A flowing in. So it would show that the combined AC-DC adapter and battery charging is only 80-85% efficient. Which would explain why AC200P may show 240W output when the EB70(S) shows 200W input.

Another thing to note is that the power output indicator seems to show how much power is being outputted, and not how much power is being pulled from the battery. So when it shows 240W output, it is likely that 280-300W is pulled from the battery due to inverter losses.

Think about it…
300W from DC battery to 110V AC 240W, back down to 28V DC to charge batttery at 200W.

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Everybody here is correct - if a AC to DC adapter is showing an output of 200W you will need more than 200W to get that output since there is overhead to convert from AC to DC.

For some reason the eb70s ac adapter by it self used 30-40w without connect to unit…when connect showing 230-240w…thinking maybe 200w to feeds the battery and 30-40w used for adapter inverter and fans…